Trini lopez - at p.j.'s


The idea of 7" singles playing at 33-1/3 rpm was hardly new when Columbia re-introduced that format to the public in 1959. Back in the late 1940s, when Columbia and RCA-Victor were battling to see which speed would replace the 78, Columbia went all the way and started issuing their now-microgroove singles on the 33 speed (see example, below right). They even added radial "rumble strips" around the label to keep them from slipping when on a changer. But they were just weren't popular with record buyers and 45s quickly won out for singles. Columbia had to be content with a victory on albums. By mid-1952, the 7" 33 singles were banished from Columbia's catalog (they had never been in other catalogs).

When rival RCA-Victor jumped in on the stereo 45s in a big way in 1958, Columbia sat back and waited. Ultimately, they totally refused to give in to RCA's stereo-45 singles, although the did start issuing stereo EPs in February, 1959. Instead, they re-introduced their brainchild 33-single, this time in stereo, during the summer of 1959.

A bad idea is also a bad idea ten years later, usually. The record buying public still disliked the 33s. As singles, you couldn't put your thumb through a stack of them to keep from dropping them, and the fidelity wasn't much improvement, if any, to most customers' ears. Within a very few months, Columbia's dream of a single-speed industry (at 33-1/3, of course) failed completely.

By the start of 1960, the only solid customer the stereo-33 single had was the juke box operators, who stocked their stereo juke boxes with them. All the record labels began shipping stereo-33 singles to the juke box people in little packets of five discs, along with title strips for the juke boxes and 5x5-inch slick photos of the album from which the packet was derived. The juke box folks loved it.

A vast majority of the stereo-33 singles listed in this discography started as part of a 5-disc package for juke boxes. By 1962, the idea of selling stereo-33 singles at the local record store was about done, and the juke boxers started going for stereo EPs and "Little LPs" with three songs on each side, costing the listener 25 cents instead of one song for 10 cents. The Little LPs lasted much longer than the stereo- 33 singles, reaching into the 1970s.

We would appreciate any additions or corrections to this discography. Just send them to us via e-mail . Both Sides Now Publications is an information web page. We are not a catalog, nor can we provide the records listed below. We have no association with any of these record labels. Should you be interested in acquiring the stereo singles listed in this discography (which are all out of print), we suggest you see our Frequently Asked Questions page and follow the instructions found there. This story and discography are copyright 2014, 2015 by Mike Callahan.

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The New Christy Minstrels (officially known as The New Christy Minstrels , Still Under the Direction of Randy Sparks) is an American large-ensemble folk music group ...

After the group toured Europe in early 1965, [13] McGuire left to embark on a solo career, and this spelled the end of the original New Christy Minstrels. Now under the direction of Greif and Garris the group moved towards a variety act , doing "novelty and pop tunes" and a little comedy, making them closer to the 19th century Christy's Minstrels from whom the group's name was derived. [3] Reflecting this shift, they had a Billboard Top 100 hit later in 1965 with a cover of " Chim Chim Cher-ee " from the Disney film Mary Poppins . [6]

This was the album that made Lopez an instant success and the live party-a-go-go atmosphere of the record did much to put Trini's likable energy over the top. What he did, at the head of a trio with Mickey Jones on drums and Dick Brant on bass, was to make folk-pop swing. Other songs include "This Land Is Your Land," and "Gotta Travel On." It could be surmised that by treating such material in this fashion, Lopez had a tiny influence upon the subsequent folk-rock movement...Though, Lopez was more the all-around entertainer with a Latin lilt than he was a pure folk singer, so you also get "America" (from West Side Story), "La Bamba," Ray Charles' "What'd I Say," "Volare," and "When the Saints Go Marching In."



We would appreciate any additions or corrections to this discography. Just send them to us via e-mail . Both Sides Now Publications is an information web page. We are not a catalog, nor can we provide the records listed below. We have no association with Reprise Records. Should you be interested in acquiring albums listed in this discography (all of which are out of print), we suggest you see our Frequently Asked Questions page and follow the instructions found there. This story and discography are copyright 2004 by Mike Callahan.

The album includes a cover of " If I Had a Hammer ", which reached number one in 36 countries (No. 3 in the United States). It sold over one million copies, [3] and was awarded a gold disc . [4] Lopez also performs a version of the traditional Mexican song " La Bamba ". This version was later re-issued as a single in 1966.


Trini Lopez - At P.J.'sTrini Lopez - At P.J.'s

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